Online school cheating and cheating on school credit online: Parents warn students about online school

The parents of a Virginia high school student who used online school cheating to take advantage of her scholarship money are warning students about cheating online.Katherine McFarland, 17, of Arlington, Virginia, was suspended from school after being caught using a stolen credit card to make purchases online.McFarland said she had been using the card since…

Published by admin inOctober 21, 2021
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The parents of a Virginia high school student who used online school cheating to take advantage of her scholarship money are warning students about cheating online.

Katherine McFarland, 17, of Arlington, Virginia, was suspended from school after being caught using a stolen credit card to make purchases online.

McFarland said she had been using the card since March and used it to pay for the cost of her tuition and books.

McDonald said she did not have the ability to pay the bills herself.

McLane said she used the card to pay her tuition at a private school, which McDonald called a “joke.”

McDonald had taken a summer internship at a Virginia public school, and McDonald said she would have to return to school to pay that cost.

McDonaugh said she also used the stolen credit to make a purchase at a Walmart online store, which McFar, who was at McDonald’s at the time, said was “just the beginning of what she was going to do.”

McDonagh said McDonald was upset and “was very angry” when she found out about the scam.

McMcDonald told ABC News she felt like the entire community was being targeted and that she would not have a job if she had not been the victim of this.

“I was really scared,” McDonald said.

“I really felt like if I did not do something about it, it would have a huge impact on the entire industry.

I didn’t want to give this to anyone.”

McDONAN: I was really afraid.

I was scared of how the entire country would react.

I was worried about the consequences of it.

McDONAGH: I wasn’t going to go to school without my family.

I would be in a very dark place.

McDoherty said McDonald has filed a police report with the Virginia Department of Education, which said it is investigating the incident.

The state’s Board of Education is expected to announce sanctions on Tuesday, which could include suspension of the student and/or expulsion of the parent.

McKenna said it’s clear that students are increasingly using online schools to get into college.

“If they want to get in, they need to go online,” she said.

“That’s what they should be doing.

That’s their right.

They should be able to do that.

But we also have to recognize that if it’s done by somebody who is not licensed to do so, then we have to get to the bottom of that and make sure that the people who are doing that are licensed and do what they’re supposed to do.

We don’t want that to happen to anyone else.”

McKENNAN: We don and we have all kinds of data on that.

McKNEE: But I don’t know if it should be happening to students, and I don, too, not feel like we’re safe.

McCLAY: There’s a lot of parents out there that are scared about that and they want this stopped.

McKennedy said she has seen her students cheat online before.

McClay said McDonald is “pretty savvy” and she knows what she’s doing.

McDonnell said she hopes to be able do something positive about the issue soon.

“She’s not going to change the world, but she’s going to be a voice for students and for parents,” McLaughlin said.

McCracken said the online school industry is still growing and she hopes it stays that way.

“This is not about me being a big target.

It’s about us as parents, as educators, and it’s about protecting our kids,” she told ABCNews.com.

“It’s really important that parents are informed about what’s going on and what their options are.”

McCrackleen said she is frustrated that she was unable to stop the fraud.

“There’s a huge market for this and we need to protect the industry,” she added.

“Parents are getting hurt and students are getting ripped off.

I’m frustrated.”

McCrechie said she will be contacting all the schools in her district to let them know of the situation.

McCrecher said she can’t help but think about how her daughter’s life could have been dramatically different had she not been a victim.

“It’s heartbreaking to think about the fact that she’s not here, that this is still going on,” she explained.

“And we need parents and educators to stop this and start protecting these students and parents.”